Sehr langsam   

Breiter (T. 100)    

Schwer betont (T. 201)    

Sehr breit und langsam (T. 229)    

Sehr ruhig (T. 370)   

>>> poem

DURATION: ca. 28 Min.

VERSIONS:
Fassung für Streichsextett (1899/1905) >>> sources
I. Fassung für Streichorchester (1917) >>> sources
II. Fassung für Streichorchester (1943) >>> sources

PUBLISHER:
Universal Edition
Belmont Music Publishers (USA, Kanada, Mexico)

Sehr langsam   

Breiter (T. 100)    

Schwer betont (T. 201)    

Sehr breit und langsam (T. 229)    

Sehr ruhig (T. 370)   

>>> poem

DURATION: ca. 28 Min.

VERSIONS:
Fassung für Streichsextett (1899/1905) >>> sources
I. Fassung für Streichorchester (1917) >>> sources
II. Fassung für Streichorchester (1943) >>> sources

PUBLISHER:
Universal Edition
Belmont Music Publishers (USA, Kanada, Mexico)

Introduction

“Yesterday evening I heard your ‘Transfigured Night’, and I should consider it a sin of omission if I failed to say a word of thanks to you for your wonderful sextet. I had intended to follow the motives of my text in your composition; but I soon forgot to do so, I was so enthralled by the music” (Richard Dehmel to Arnold Schönberg, 12 December 1912). Arnold Schönberg composed his op. 4 in just three weeks in September 1899, while vacationing in Payerbach at Semmering with Alexander von Zemlinsky and Zemlinsky’s sister Mathilde – who would become Schönberg’s first wife. The final version of the manuscript is dated 1 December 1899. The subject of this programme music, which “restricts itself to sketching nature and expressing human emotions” (Schönberg), is Richard Dehmel’s poem “Verklärte Nacht,” from the collection “Woman and World” (“Weib und Welt”) published in 1896. Before the first World War Dehmel was one of Germany’s most highly regarded lyric poets. His principal work, “Two Figures: A Novel in Romances” (“Zwei Menschen. Roman in Romanzen,” 1903), essayed eroticism and sexuality within the context of stylistic conceptions of art nouveau (Jugendstil). The first main piece of the “Novel” is “Verklärte Nacht” (a poem already once published, but without title), which is carried by the “pathos of a new, anti-bourgeois sexual morality [and] the idea of an all-conquering Eros that shuns every convention” (Hans Heinz Stuckenschmidt). The five verses of the poem sketch in sections of clearly contrasting content: a forest scene with two figures (Nos. 1, 3, 5); the words of a woman who loves one man but is expecting a child from another, and who thus reproaches herself (No. 2); the words of the man, who comforts the woman and accepts the child as his own (No. 4). Dehmel’s poem drew upon an autobiographical episode, insofar as it alludes to his liaison with Ida Auerbach, whom he met as she was already carrying a child by her husband, Consul Auerbach. The daughter in an upper-class Jewish family played an essential role in the constellation Stefan George – Richard Dehmel – Arnold Schönberg: George elaborated upon his unspoken love for her in his autobiographically composed “Book of the Hanging Gardens” (“Buch der hängenden Gärten”), fifteen poems of which Arnold Schönberg would set as op. 15. The genre of programme music appears to have occupied Schönberg intensely in the year preceding composition of his op. 4. So much, at least, is suggested by those compositions which remain as fragments: “Hans, the Lucky One” (“Hans im Glück”), “The Death of Spring” (“Frühlingstod”), and “Blind Corner” (“Toter Winkel”), the latter also a string sextet. His blossoming relationship with Mathilde Zemlinsky in 1899 may also have been decisive in his specific choice of programme for op. 4. As a one-movement form, “Verklärte Nacht” represents a conjunction of two developmental trends in the music of the late 19th century: the inclination towards the one-movement sonata (Franz Liszt’s Sonata in B-minor stands as historical model) and the one-movement symphonic poem. The formal arrangement in Schönberg’s op. 4 by and large adheres to the literary model, whereby the narrative sections (the woods scenes) and internal episodes (direct discourse) find their parallel in rondo form. The first section unfurls in dense motivic mastery and epic gestures a picture of a clear, moonlit night, that in the second section, through the confession of a tragedy (the first theme is linked by D minor to the preceding episode), leads to a “dramatic outburst” (Schönberg, 1950, in his Programme Notes to “Verklärte Nacht”). The first section now clearly set off by a fermata, the second theme follows in B-flat minor to illustrate the misfortune and loneliness of the woman. A third theme in C minor elucidates the compulsion for fidelity: after the woman “finally obeyed her maternal instinct, she carries a child from a man she does not love. She had even considered herself praiseworthy for fulfilling her duty towards the demands of nature.” This section of Dehmel’s poem is expounded by a fourth theme in E major, which in its further elaboration quotes motives from material heard previously and leads to a distinct caesura. There follows a contrasting, homogenous passage, with new shadings of timbre, as bridge to the third formal section. This in turn draws upon the principal opening motive, thereafter continuing in the style of ‘developing variation’ (reminiscent of Johannes Brahms). The discourse of the man, “whose generosity is as noble as his love,” modulates in the fourth section to the ”extreme contrast of Dmajor.” Mutes and harmonics express in new sound effects the “beauty of the moonlight.” According to Schönberg, this episode “reflects the mood of a man whose love, in harmony with the splendor and radiance of nature, is capable of ignoring the tragic situation.” The fifth section assumes the function of an all-encompassing coda based not only on the opening motive, now transformed to major (and as its counterpoint the principal theme of the fourth section), but also on thematic components of the third section. At the end of 1939 the American publisher Edwin F. Kalmus approached Schönberg with the wish to publish a new edition of “Verklärte Nacht.” Schönberg agreed, provided it be an improved edition (alterations in dynamics, bowings, etc.) in an arrangement for string orchestra. Even as early as 1917 the composer had prepared for Universal Edition a version of op. 4 for string orchestra with a supplementary part for contrabass (the first known performance of the work in this form took place in the Leipzig Gewandhaus on 14 March 1918); but the experience of numerous performances had pursuaded him to reshape this version as well. When the contract with Kalmus failed to materialize, Schönberg approached Associated Music Publishers in New York. The modifications in the arrangement for string orchestra (which was issued by AMP in 1943) concern primarily dynamics and articulation, but also tempo markings. In a letter of 22 December 1942 Schönberg describes the essential improvements over the edition of 1917: “The new version [...] will improve the balance between first and second violins on the one hand, and viola and cello on the other, and restore the balance of the original version of the sextet with its six equivalent instruments.”

Therese Muxeneder
© Arnold Schönberg Center

Announcement (1902)

Arnold Schönberg on »Verklärte Nacht«
Deutsche Tonkünstler-Zeitung (21. Oktober 1902)


Arnold Schönberg writes the following about himself and his String Quartet [sic], October 21, 1902: I was born in Vienna on September 13, 1874. Since originally I was supposed to become an engineer, it was only rather late that I came to pursue my inclination for music and embraced it as a profession. At age 21 I still had no theoretical training, but I was successful enough as an autodidact that after a year of composing under Alexander von Zemlinsky’s tutelage I was able to get a public performance of a string quartet.
In composing Verklärte Nacht, based on the poem by Richard Dehmel, my aim was to attempt in chamber music those new forms that had emerged when orchestral music took poetic ideas as its basis. If the orchestra can reveal the epic-dramatic structures of compositional creative work, then chamber music can represent the lyric or lyric-epic. Now even if the means of the latter when it comes to expressive ability lag well behind those of an orchestra – a lack that is only noticeable when the two are compared, and which also however, presuming it really exists, would, when it comes to instrumental color, tend to favor the symphony rather than the string quartet – the structuring principle is still the common denominator. This is an ancient principle and derives its origin from those old masters, who, in text repetitions that today seem endless, continued to fantasize musically about a poetic idea until they had gained all possible moods and meanings from it – I would almost say: until they had analyzed it.

Translation: Schoenberg’s Program Notes and Musical Analyses. Edited by J. Daniel Jenkins. New York: Oxford University Press 216, p. 112–113 (Schoenberg in Words 5)

Notes (1950)

Arnold Schönberg: Program-Notes (Analysis)
In German

Am Ende des neunzehnten Jahrhunderts waren Detlev von Liliencron, Hugo von Hofmannsthal und Richard Dehmel die vordersten Vertreter des »Zeitgeistes« in der Lyrik. In der Musik hingegen folgten nach dem Tod von Brahms viele junge Komponisten dem Vorbild von Richard Strauss und komponierten Programmusik. Dies erklärt den Ursprung der Verklärten Nacht: es ist Programmusik, die das Gedicht von Richard Dehmel schildert und zum Ausdruck bringt.

Meine Komposition unterschied sich vielleicht etwas von anderen illustrativen Kompositionen erstens, indem sie nicht für Orchester, sondern für Kammerbesetzung ist, und zweitens, weil sie nicht irgendeine Handlung oder ein Drama schildert, sondern sich darauf beschränkt, die Natur zu zeichnen und menschliche Gefühle auszudrücken. Es scheint, dass meine Komposition aufgrund dieser Haltung Qualität gewonnen hat, die auch befriedigen, wenn man nicht weiß, was sie schildert, oder, mit anderen Worten, sie bietet die Möglichkeit, als reine »reine« Musik geschätzt zu werden. Daher vermag sie einen vielleicht das Gedicht vergessen lassen, das mancher heutzutage als ziemlich abstoßend bezeichnen würde.

Dessen ungeachtet verdient vieles von dem Gedicht Anerkennung wegen seiner in höchstem Maße poetischen Darstellung der Gefühlsregungen, die durch die Schönheit der Natur hervorgehoben werden, und wegen seiner bemerkenswerten moralischen Haltung bei der Behandlung eines erschütternd schwierigen Problems.

Bei einem Spaziergang im Park

in einer klaren, kalten Mondnacht

bekennt die Frau dem Mann in einem dramatischen Ausbruch eine Tragödie

Sie hatte einen Mann geheiratet, den sie nicht liebte. Sie war unglücklich und einsam in dieser Ehe,

zwang sich aber zur Treue,

und nachdem sie schließlich dem mütterlichen Instinkt gefolgt ist, trägt sie jetzt ein Kind von einem Mann, den sie nicht liebt. Sie hat ihre Pflichterfüllung gegenüber den Forderungen der Natur sogar für lobenswert gehalten.

Ein höhepunktartiger Aufstieg, der das Motiv verarbeitet, drückt aus, wie sie sich selber ihrer großen Sünde bezichtigt.

Voller Verzweiflung geht sie nun neben dem Mann her, den sie liebt, und fürchtet, dass sein Urteilsspruch sie vernichten wird.

Aber »die Stimme eines Mannes spricht«, eines Mannes, dessen Großmut so erhaben ist wie seine Liebe.

Die vorausgegangene erste Hälfte der Komposition endet auf es-Moll (a), von dem als Überleitung nur (b) liegenbleibt, um mit dem äußersten Gegensatz D-Dur zu verbinden. (c)
Harmonien (a), die mit gedämpften Läufen ausgezeichnet sind (b), drücken die Schönheit des Mondlichts aus

und über einer flimmernden Begleitung

wird ein Nebenthema geführt,

das bald in ein Duett zwischen Violine und Cello übergeht.

Dieser Abschnitt gibt die Stimmung des Mannes wieder, dessen Liebe im Einklang mit dem Schimmer und dem Glanz der Natur fähig ist, die tragische Situation zu leugnen: »Das Kind, das Du empfangen hast, sei Deiner Seele keine Last.«
Nachdem das Duett einen Höhepunkt erreicht hat, wird es durch eine Überleitung mit einem neuen Thema verbunden.

Seiner Melodie, die die »Wärme« ausdrückt, die »flimmert von Dir in mich, von mir in Dich«, die Wärme der Liebe, folgen Wiederholungen und Verarbeitungen früherer Themen. Schließlich führt es zu einem weiteren neuen Thema, das dem würdigen Entschluss des Mannes entspricht: die Wärme »wir das fremde Kind verklären, Du wirst es mir, von mir gebären«.

Ein Aufstieg führt zum Höhepunkt, zu einer Wiederholung des Themas des Mannes zu Beginn des zweiten Teiles.
Ein langer Coda-Anschnitt beschließt das Werk. Sein Material besteht aus Themen der vorausgehenden Teile. Alle sind von neuem verändert, wie im die Wunder der Natur zu verherrlichen, die diese Nacht der Tragödie in eine verklärte Nacht verwandelt haben.

Man darf nicht vergessen, dass dieses Werk bei seiner Erstaufführung in Wien ausgezischt wurde und Unruhe und Faustkämpfe verursachte. Aber es hatte sehr bald großen Erfolg.

Arnold Schönberg: Stil und Gedanken. Aufsätze zur Musik. Herausgegeben von Ivan Vojtech. Frankfurt am Main 1976. p. 453-457. (Gesammelte Schriften. 1)